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Posted by on Jan 4, 2012 in Bargains, Tips | 0 comments

Editor’s Favorite: Vitamin D3

Editor’s Favorite: Vitamin D3

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Now that winter is officially underway, we  can look forward to cold dreary days and much less sunshine. And while I find the shorter days depressing, a greater concern is the possibility of Vitamin D deficiency. Unfortunately I can’t get much Vitamin D by sticking to a healthy diet; the few foods that contain Vitamin have it in small amounts. There are just two ways the body can get the amounts of  Vitamin D it needs: from sunshine, at least 15 minutes of exposure (that’s why it’s called the “sunshine vitamin”) or from Vitamin D supplements.

Vitamin D supports the absorption of calcium (important for bone health) and boosts breast, colon and prostate health. Hundreds of studies cite its role in supporting a healthy immune system. Conversely, Vitamin D deficiency negatively affects cell growth, skeletal structure, hormal balance, heart health, the immune system, etc.

Fat-soluble Vitamin D has two forms: Vitamin D2 and Vitamin D3. Both are beneficial, but it is the D3 form (also known as cholecalciferol)  that is most effective.

Experts vary in the dosages they recommend. A common recommendation for  healthy adults  is 1000 IU per day of vitamin D3 . The American Academy of Pediatrics recommending 400 IU per day of Vitamin D3 taken with food for children. During the winter months, I take 5000 IU.

There are many reputable brands of Vitamin D3. I like the Coral LLC brand, sold online for between $15-$20 for 100 capsules.

For more information about Vitamin D, check the Vitamin D Council.

 

 

 

As colossal storms cloak the country in darkness, many face days, weeks – maybe even months – without sunshine. And while life without sun can be dreary and downright depressing, it can also be hazardous to one’s health.

Decreased sun exposure increases the likelihood of deficiency in Vitamin D, the “sunshine vitamin” naturally and abundantly available from the sun. This essential vitamin – D3, in particular – helps boost the immune system and prevent serious diseases such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes and more.

 

Current research concludes that anyone not receiving regular midday sunlight should supplement with approximately 5,000 IUs of vitamin D daily.

 

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